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Example Class

Class Report

Self-Aware Student

Introduction 00

This report is for staff and teachers to see a class as a whole.  To see the class strengths and weaknesses.  Additionally, it breaks the class into a variety of groupings to make it easier to see how the different groups of students have different needs and preferences.

 

For most teachers it is easiest to find the section that most applies to the challenges that they are dealing with and then focus on writing out a plan on how to work more effectively with each group of students.

Group Members Overview 01

A list of team members by their inclusion in the report based on their available data.

This section just lists which people are being considered in this report, and for convenience, lists their type code. This can easily list their best fit from whichever model is preferred or being used.

The following individuals are included in the results:

  • Angela Person

    ENFP
  • Beth Person

    INTP
  • Bob Person

    ESFJ
  • Catherine Person

    ISFJ
  • Elise Person

    ISFJ
  • Robert Person

    INFP
  • Sandra Person

    INTP
  • Sarah Person

    ISTJ

The following individuals are not included in the results.

This is likely because they took an old version of the assessment, or have not taken the assessment.

Group Members Overview Authors
Original work by: © Step Research Corporation

Group Preferences 02

This shows a groups balance of preferences

This shows a groups balance of preferences.

Energy Extraversion/Introversion

25% 75%

Information Sensing/Intuition

50% 50%

Decisions Thinking/Feeling

38% 63%

Lifestyle Judging/Perceiving

50% 50%
Group Preferences Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation

Team Essential Motivators 03

Essential Motivators, your core psychological needs, values and talents as described by Linda Berens

What are your core psychological needs, values and talents? What needs are so essential to your existence that you will go to great lengths to get them met? Your core psychological needs and values have been with you from the beginning as well as the talents that help you scratch the itch that the needs create. This is the heart of who we are, so you will learn more about the essence of the roots of your personality as well as of those around you. This will open up a deep understanding of different perspectives, different talent agendas, and sources of conflict and stress. The Essential Motivators aspect of the Berens CORE™ lenses is grounded in the patterns David Keirsey called temperament and that were further differentiated and refined by Linda Berens.

Catalyst

Diplomatic Skills

At work, promotes

Growth

25%
Angela Person
Robert Person

Improviser

Tactical Skills

At work, promotes

Opportunity

0%

Stabilizer

Logistical Skills

At work, promotes

Structure

50%
Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sarah Person

Theorist

Strategic Skills

At work, promotes

Efficiency

25%
Beth Person
Sandra Person

Detail For Each Essential Motivator

Catalysts motto:

To thine own self be true.


Catalysts:

Angela Person
Robert Person

Catalyst Essential Motivator Snapshot

Want to be authentic, benevolent, and empathic. Search for identity, meaning, and significance. Are relationship oriented, particularly valuing meaningful relationships. Tend to be idealistic and visionary, wanting to make the world a better place. Look to the future. Trust their intuition, imagination, and impressions. Focus on developing potential, fostering and facilitating growth through coaching, teaching, counseling, and communicating. Generally are enthusiastic. Think in terms of integration and similarities and look for universals. Often are gifted in the use of metaphors to bridge different perspectives. Usually are diplomatic. Frequently are drawn to work that inspires and develops people and relationships.

Catalyst Essential Motivator Skill Set

  • Diplomatic Skill Set
  • Build bridges between people
  • Have empathy
  • Strive to unify by understanding and resolving deeper issues while honoring individual uniqueness
  • Move to a level of abstraction to see how two seemingly different views are alike and then to choose a symbolic way of communicating the similarity to transcend differences
  • Help others harmonize and clarify their values to bring unity to the individual and the group
  • Have foresight and vision with implications for developing the people involved, then communicating that vision so it is accepted and followed
  • Help others find their path and inspire them to follow it
  • Envision and then mentor others to achieve the envisioned potential

Improvisers motto:

Carpe Diem (Seize the day)


Improvisers:

Improviser Essential Motivator Snapshot

Want the freedom to choose the next act. Seek to have impact, to get results. Want to be graceful, bold, and impressive. Generally are excited and optimistic. Are absorbed in the action of the moment. Are oriented toward the present. Seek adventure and stimulation. Hunger for spontaneity. Trust impulses, luck, and their ability to solve any problem they run into. Think in terms of variation. Have a talent for noticing and describing rich detail, constantly seeking relevant information. Like freedom to move, festivities, and games. Tend to be natural negotiators. Seize opportunities. Usually are gifted tacticians, deciding the best move to make in the moment, the expedient action to take. Are frequently drawn to all kinds of work that requires variation on a theme.

Improviser Essential Motivator Skill Set

  • Tactical Skill Set
  • Read the current context, the situation, and skillfully manage the situation
  • Get an expedient result, often coming up with a variety of solutions or approaches
  • Take action according to the needs of the moment and plan the next move
  • Cleverly display, compose, and perform with attention to impact and effect
  • Compose and produce just the right result that expresses the input of all those concerned
  • Analyze and look at all the angles beforehand, getting a sense of the situation and then being free to operate in the moment as things change
  • Motivate others, often through a lively and moving presentation
  • Promote and execute actions in response to the varying demands of the situation, going around obstacles when necessary

Stabilizers motto:

Early to bed; early to rise...


Stabilizers:

Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sarah Person

Stabilizer Essential Motivator Snapshot

Want to fit in, to have membership. Hunger for responsibility, accountability, and predictability. Tend to be generous, to serve, and to do their duty. Establish and maintain institutions and standard operating procedures. Tend to protect and preserve, to stand guard and warn. Look to the past and tradition. Foster enculturation with ceremonies and rules. Trust contracts and authority. Want security and stability. Think in terms of what is conventional, comparisons, associations, and discrete elements. Generally are serious, concerned, and fatalistic. Usually are skilled at ensuring that things, information, and people are in the right place, in the right amounts, in the right quality, at the right time. Frequently gravitate toward business and commerce.

Stabilizer Essential Motivator Skill Set

  • Logistical Skill Set
  • Provide the logistical support and protection necessary for people to get things done right and make sure things go well and don’t go wrong
  • Provide service and caretaking that help people get underway
  • Get the right things and the right information in the right place, at the right time, in the right quantity, in the right quality, to the right people, and not to the wrong people
  • Attend to people’s comforts and make things easy for others
  • Standardize, establish, and oversee policies and procedures that provide stability for the group
  • Investigate what has happened before, carefully describe where we want to go and how to get there, and monitor the plan along the way
  • Shelter and protect to ensure safety and well-being
  • Examine, assess, and instruct to meet standards

Theorists motto:

Be excellent in all things.


Theorists:

Beth Person
Sandra Person

Theorist Essential Motivator Snapshot

Want knowledge and to be competent, to achieve mastery. Seek expertise to understand how the world and things in it work. Are theory oriented. See everything as conditional and relative. Are oriented to the infinite. Trust logic and reason. Want to have a rationale for everything. Are skeptical. Think in terms of differences, delineating categories, definitions, structures, and functions. Hunger for precision, especially in thought and language. Usually are skilled at long-range planning, inventing, designing, and defining. Generally are calm. Foster individualism. Frequently gravitate toward technology and the sciences. Tend to be well suited for engineering and devising strategy, whether in the social sciences or physical sciences.

Theorist Essential Motivator Skill Set

  • Strategic Skill Set
  • Think of and explain all the possible contingencies and influencing factors and then design processes for achieving the objectives
  • Abstractly analyze a situation and consider previously unthought-of possibilities
  • Look at the relationships between the goals and the means for unintended consequences
  • Identify ways to improve and make progress relative to long-term goals
  • Integrate ideas into cohesive theories and design processes that strategically meet the wants and needs of others
  • Implement a vision of the future—conceiving of a way to be in the future as well as the action steps needed to get there
  • Generate and share a multitude of ideas and possibilities for action
  • Mobilize and coordinate the actions of others to implement a strategy
Team Essential Motivators Authors
Original work by: Linda Berens © Step Research Corporation

Team Essential Communication 04

Essential Motivators, your core psychological needs, values and talents as described by Linda Berens

What are your core psychological needs, values and talents? What needs are so essential to your existence that you will go to great lengths to get them met? Your core psychological needs and values have been with you from the beginning as well as the talents that help you scratch the itch that the needs create. This is the heart of who we are, so you will learn more about the essence of the roots of your personality as well as of those around you. This will open up a deep understanding of different perspectives, different talent agendas, and sources of conflict and stress. The Essential Motivators aspect of the Berens CORE™ lenses is grounded in the patterns David Keirsey called temperament and that were further differentiated and refined by Linda Berens.

Communication Comparison

Abstract Communication Concrete Communication
50% 50%
  • Angela Person
  • Beth Person
  • Robert Person
  • Sandra Person
  • Bob Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Sarah Person

Communication Details

Abstract Communication Concrete Communication
50% 50%

Focus On

  • Intangibles—concepts, ideas, implications, and meanings

Focus On

  • Tangibles—experiences and observations

Intent

  • Know or explain the meaning of something that is not seen in order to access information not obvious

Intent

  • Get or give useful concrete information to plan for the future or take action in the present

Behavior

  • Ask questions to get the meaning or logic and understand the pattern
  • Often use metaphors and speak symbolically
  • Talk about intuitions and insights

Behavior

  • Ask questions to get the details or see a pattern
  • Often use analogies and reference the facts
  • Talk about hunches and gut reactions

Comfort Zone

  • Introspection
  • What is ideal
  • More comfortable with ideas, conjecture, conceptualizing, envisioning, and figurative expressions

Comfort Zone

  • Observation
  • What is real
  • More comfortable with firsthand experiences and descriptions of actual events or situations

Tendencies

  • Often see reality as arbitrary
  • Seek concepts and meanings to focus on details - impatient with concrete details in isolation

Tendencies

  • Often see ideas as arbitrary
  • Seek details about the pieces to build concepts and patterns—impatient when concepts; patterns; and theories are presented alone
Team Essential Communication Authors
Original work by: Linda Berens © Step Research Corporation

Team Essential Roles 05

Essential Motivators, your core psychological needs, values and talents as described by Linda Berens

What are your core psychological needs, values and talents? What needs are so essential to your existence that you will go to great lengths to get them met? Your core psychological needs and values have been with you from the beginning as well as the talents that help you scratch the itch that the needs create. This is the heart of who we are, so you will learn more about the essence of the roots of your personality as well as of those around you. This will open up a deep understanding of different perspectives, different talent agendas, and sources of conflict and stress. The Essential Motivators aspect of the Berens CORE™ lenses is grounded in the patterns David Keirsey called temperament and that were further differentiated and refined by Linda Berens.

Roles Comparison

Affiliative Roles Pragmatic Roles
75% 25%
  • Angela Person
  • Bob Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Robert Person
  • Sarah Person
  • Beth Person
  • Sandra Person

Roles Details

Affiliative Roles Pragmatic Roles
75% 25%

Focus On

  • Interdependence
  • Human and group effectiveness

Focus On

  • Independence
  • Effectiveness

Intent

  • Inclusion

Intent

  • Self-determination

Behavior

  • Cooperative actions
  • Seeking agreement
  • Sanction: checking in with norms and values

Behavior

  • Autonomous actions
  • Seeking outcomes
  • Expedience: choosing actions to meet goals

Comfort Zone

  • Comfortable having defined roles
  • When people cooperate and get along

Comfort Zone

  • Comfortable being free to engage in expedient actions regardless of roles
  • When the focus is on excellence in performance

Tendencies

  • Uneasy when people don’t work together toward a goal
  • Often surprised when people don’t want defined roles
  • May be frustrated by what appears to be a lack of cooperation
  • May be seen as too “other centered”

Tendencies

  • Uneasy when roles are decided for them
  • Often surprised when people are offended at their independent actions
  • May be frustrated by what seem to be roadblocks to expedient action
  • May be seen as too independent
Team Essential Roles Authors
Original work by: Linda Berens © Step Research Corporation

Team Essential Attention 06

Essential Motivators, your core psychological needs, values and talents as described by Linda Berens

What are your core psychological needs, values and talents? What needs are so essential to your existence that you will go to great lengths to get them met? Your core psychological needs and values have been with you from the beginning as well as the talents that help you scratch the itch that the needs create. This is the heart of who we are, so you will learn more about the essence of the roots of your personality as well as of those around you. This will open up a deep understanding of different perspectives, different talent agendas, and sources of conflict and stress. The Essential Motivators aspect of the Berens CORE™ lenses is grounded in the patterns David Keirsey called temperament and that were further differentiated and refined by Linda Berens.

Attention Comparison

Structure Attention Motive Attention
50% 50%
  • Bob Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Sarah Person
  • Angela Person
  • Beth Person
  • Robert Person
  • Sandra Person

Attention Details

Structure Attention Motive Attention
50% 50%

Focus On

  • Order and organization

Focus On

  • Why people do things

Intent

  • Have a measure of control over life’s problems and irregularities rather than be at the mercy of random forces

Intent

  • Have a way to work with the people they are communicating with rather than trying to force them into a preconceived structure

Behavior

  • Ask or wonder about how things are organized or sequenced
  • Notice and refer to methods and requirements or rules

Behavior

  • Ask or wonder about what is motivating someone
  • Notice and refer to “what’s in it” for the other person

Comfort Zone

  • More comfortable when the order of things is clear

Comfort Zone

  • More comfortable when others’ motives are clear

Tendencies

  • Detect the details of the content of a communication and miss the real purpose behind a behavior

Tendencies

  • Detect the purpose behind a behavior and miss pieces of the content of a communication
Team Essential Attention Authors
Original work by: Linda Berens © Step Research Corporation

Team Core Needs 07

Essential Motivators, your core psychological needs, values and talents as described by Linda Berens

What are your core psychological needs, values and talents? What needs are so essential to your existence that you will go to great lengths to get them met? Your core psychological needs and values have been with you from the beginning as well as the talents that help you scratch the itch that the needs create. This is the heart of who we are, so you will learn more about the essence of the roots of your personality as well as of those around you. This will open up a deep understanding of different perspectives, different talent agendas, and sources of conflict and stress. The Essential Motivators aspect of the Berens CORE™ lenses is grounded in the patterns David Keirsey called temperament and that were further differentiated and refined by Linda Berens.

Catalyst

Unique identity

Motivating Environment

Expressive
Personal

25%
Angela Person
Robert Person

Improviser

Freedom

Motivating Environment

Stimulating
Varied

0%

Stabilizer

Belonging

Motivating Environment

Organized
Secure

50%
Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sarah Person

Theorist

Competence

Motivating Environment

Innovative
Intellectual

25%
Beth Person
Sandra Person

Detail For Each Essential Motivator

When communicating with Catalysts focus on:

Growth

Catalysts:

Angela Person
Robert Person

Catalyst Essential Motivator Core Needs

The core needs are for the meaning and significance that come from having a sense of purpose and working toward some greater good. They need to have a sense of unique identity. They value unity, self-actualization, and authenticity. People of this temperament prefer cooperative interactions with a focus on ethics and morality. They tend to trust their intuition and impressions first and then seek to find the logic and the data to support them. Given their need for empathic relationships, they learn more easily when they can relate to the instructor and the group.

Catalyst Essential Motivator stressors

  • Insincerity and betrayal
  • Loss of meaning
  • Lack of integrity

When communicating with Improvisers focus on:

Relevance

Improvisers:

Improviser Essential Motivator Core Needs

The core needs are to have the freedom to act without hindrance and to see a marked result from action. People of this temperament highly value aesthetics, whether in nature or art. Their energies are focused on skillful performance, variety, and stimulation. They tend toward pragmatic, utilitarian actions with a focus on technique. They trust their impulses and have a drive to action. They learn best experientially and when they see the relevance of what they are learning to what they are doing. They enjoy hands-on, applied learning with a fast pace and freedom to explore.

Improviser Essential Motivator stressors

  • Constraint
  • Boredom
  • Lack of impact

When communicating with Stabilizers focus on:

Usefulness

Stabilizers:

Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sarah Person

Stabilizer Essential Motivator Core Needs

The core needs are for group membership and responsibility. They need to know they are doing the responsible thing. They value stability, security, and a sense of community. They trust hierarchy and authority and may be surprised when others go against these social structures. People of this temperament prefer cooperative actions with a focus on standards and norms. Their orientation is to their past experiences, and they like things sequenced and structured. They tend to look for the practical applications of what they are learning.

Stabilizer Essential Motivator stressors

  • Abandonment
  • Instability
  • Lack of belonging

When communicating with Theorists focus on:

Competence

Theorists:

Beth Person
Sandra Person

Theorist Essential Motivator Core Needs

The core needs are for mastery of concepts, knowledge, and competence. People of this temperament want to understand the operating principles of the universe and to learn or even develop theories for everything. They value expertise, logical consistency, concepts, and ideas and seeks progress. They tend toward pragmatic, utilitarian actions with a technology focus. They trust logic above all else. They tend to be skeptical and highly value precision in language. Their learning style is conceptual, and they want to know the underlying principles that generate the details and facts rather than the details alone.

Theorist Essential Motivator stressors

  • Powerlessness
  • Incompetence
  • Lack of knowledge
Team Core Needs Authors
Original work by: Linda Berens © Step Research Corporation

Team Engagement Styles 08

Describes how you prefer to interact and engage with others you are working with in order to help you visualize how you can make the biggest and most significant contributions.

This section shows how the team will predominantly prefer to do it’s work and engage with others. This is built on the 8 cognitive functions, and also be translated as effectively the exterior letters of the type code. The framing around Opportunities and Threats is meant to mirror the traditional corporate business SWOT analysis thinking (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) and complement the Team Strengths and Weaknesses section.
Carefully Understand
Understand ramifications
Making the plan
Analysis paralysis
Refusal to change plan
33
Refine for Perfection
Tweak to improve 
Quietly fixing things
Never finished updating
Lack of decision
32
Dynamically Explore
Energetic discovery
Building enthusiasm
Unnecessary changes
Not completing
18
Organize and Direct
Move others forward
Achieving goals
Badgering
Hasty decisions
17
Team Engagement Styles Authors
Original work by: Sterling Bates Gene Bellotti © Step Research Corporation

Team Conversations 09

How your team can better communicate with each other

How your team can better communicate with each other

HOW Problem Solving is based on the two middle letters in the type code – ST, SF, NT or NF, which are of great importance to focus, motivation and interests when solving problems and making decisions. 

ST - Practical & Matter-Of-Fact

”Let ́s do it the right way”

Motivating Words

Examine, apply, simplify, specify.

13%
Sarah Person

SF - Sympathetic & Friendly

“Let’s cooperate”

Motivating Words

Share, cooperate, help, describe.

63%
Beth Person
Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sandra Person

NF - Enthusiastic & Insightful

“Let’s do it in a different way”

Motivating Words

Create, discover, reform, imagine.

25%
Angela Person
Robert Person

NT - Logical & Ingenious

”Let’s change the system”

Motivating Words

Develop, critisise, theorise, conceptualise.

0%

Detailed Conversation Advice

Conversations with ST - Practical & Matter-Of-Fact

”Let ́s do it the right way”


Practical & Matter-Of-Facts:

Sarah Person

How to talk to Practical & Matter-Of-Facts

  • Get to the point
    Explain what the purpose of the conversation is. Do not waste time on chitchat. Be concise and avoid vague statements.
  • Be factual
    Be accurate with facts and present them in a structured way. Start at the beginning and proceed step by step. Be prepared to go into details especially concerning “when, how and why.”
  • Be concrete
    Talk about the tangible, realistic and practical aspects. Use examples. Avoid talking too much about “the big picture” and how things relate on a higher level unless the ST requests this. Focus on the here and now.
  • Include experience
    Recognise the need for knowing the tried and tested ways – what works. Ask about past experience in similar situations.
  • Refer to logic
    Focus on logic and analysis. Pros and cons. Remember that efficiency and logical and coherent arguments are important.
  • Focus on tasks
    Talk about specific tasks and problem solving. Be matter-of-fact. Remember to distinguish between personal and impersonal matters.
  • Be direct
    Be objective and direct in your communication. Avoid ambiguity and do not soften your message. Tell it like it is. Ask specific questions.
  • Acknowledge accomplishments
    Be concrete and give examples of good results. Do not use truisms as praise.
  • Motivating words for ST
    Examine, apply, simplify, specify.

Conversations with SF - Sympathetic & Friendly

“Let’s cooperate”


Sympathetic & Friendlys:

Beth Person
Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sandra Person

How to talk to Sympathetic & Friendlys

  • Show a personal interest
    Start by asking how the SF is doing. Remember that a good atmosphere and trust between you is essential. Be friendly.
  • Know your facts
    Get the facts right and present them in a structured way. Start at the beginning and proceed step by step. Be prepared to go into details especially when it concerns people and their relationships.
  • Be concrete
    Talk about the tangible, realistic and practical aspects. Use examples. Avoid talking too much about “the big picture” and how things relate on a higher level unless the SF requests this. Focus on the here and now.
  • Focus on human aspects
    Involve values, concern for others and personal views as important data. Focus on how to meet practical needs of people in their everyday lives.
  • Include experience
    Accommodate the need for knowing the tried and tested ways – what works. Ask about past experience in similar situations.
  • Make conversation
    Avoid talking too much without the SF being involved. Show interest and sympathy. Ask specific questions. Be open to hearing personal reactions. Focus on building the relationship.
  • Be positive
    Keep criticism at a minimum. Tone down your language. Be people centred. Remember that caring for others is important for the SF.
  • Give sincere compliments
    Acknowledge results, but also remember to praise personal involvement, cooperation and contributions during the process.
  • Motivating words for SF
    Share, cooperate, help, describe.

Conversations with NF - Enthusiastic & Insightful

“Let’s do it in a different way”


Enthusiastic & Insightfuls:

Angela Person
Robert Person

How to talk to Enthusiastic & Insightfuls

  • Show a personal interest
    Start by asking how the NF is doing. Remember that harmony, a positive attitude and an authentic relationship between you is essential.
  • Present the vision
    Explain how the NF fits with the vision in a meaningful way. Remember to focus on why what you are talking about is important for human growth and development. Talk about the “higher purpose”. Present options.
  • Present the big picture
    Talk about concepts and themes and clarify correlations and context. Be associative, not sequential. Avoid too many details unless the NF requests this.
  • Focus on the long-term perspective
    Be future-oriented. Talk about new solutions and opportunities for development of human potential – especially in the long run.
  • Be open
    Acknowledge initiatives concerning new and different ways of doing things. Do not turn down ideas too fast. Challenge the imagination. Ask open-ended questions.
  • Make conversation
    Avoid talking too much without the NF being involved. Dialogue is the most important tool for the NF. Show interest and empathy. Tone down your language.
  • Incorporate values
    Consider values and needs of people as important data. Allow and invite personal views and idealistic thoughts.
  • Give sincere compliments
    Appreciate the ideas and unique role of the NF, and remember to praise contributions to the process and personality not just accomplishments.
  • Motivating words for NF
    Create, discover, reform, imagine.

Conversations with NT - Logical & Ingenious

”Let’s change the system”


Logical & Ingeniouss:

How to talk to Logical & Ingeniouss

  • Present the vision
    Start by telling about the vision and what the NT’s intellectual contribution to advance the vision is or could be. Present options.
  • Focus on competence
    Establish credibility quickly. Be convincing. Recognise theoretical knowledge and competence. Remember that focus on problem solving is important.
  • Describe the big picture
    Talk about concepts and themes and clarify correlations and context. Avoid too many details unless the NT requests this.
  • Focus on the long-term perspective
    Be future-oriented. Talk about the opportunities for strategic progress and improvement of the current structures – especially in the long run.
  • Be open
    Acknowledge proposals about new and different ways of doing things. Try not to reject ideas too fast. Give autonomy. Ask open-ended questions.
  • Debate ideas and analyses
    Present exciting challenges to conquer. View questions and critique as a contribution to a better analysis and a better strategy. Be prepared to argue. The NT appreciates a good debate.
  • Be direct
    Be objective, systematic, logical, analytical and straightforward in your communication. Do not soften your message. Tell it like it is.
  • Acknowledge ideas and accomplishments
    Appreciate the NT’s ability to think outside the box and challenge the existing notions. Acknowledge results and “intellectual mastery”.
  • Motivating words for NT
    Develop, critisise, theorise, conceptualise.
Team Conversations Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation

Team Problem Solving 010

How your team can better problem solve

This describes how your team can improve on your problem solving and decision-making skills.

HOW Problem Solving is based on the two middle letters in the type code – ST, SF, NT or NF, which are of great importance to focus, motivation and interests when solving problems and making decisions. 

ST - Practical & Matter-Of-Fact

”Let ́s do it the right way”

Motivating Words

Examine, apply, simplify, specify.

13%
Sarah Person

SF - Sympathetic & Friendly

“Let’s cooperate”

Motivating Words

Share, cooperate, help, describe.

63%
Beth Person
Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sandra Person

NF - Enthusiastic & Insightful

“Let’s do it in a different way”

Motivating Words

Create, discover, reform, imagine.

25%
Angela Person
Robert Person

NT - Logical & Ingenious

”Let’s change the system”

Motivating Words

Develop, critisise, theorise, conceptualise.

0%

Detailed Problem Solving Advice

Problem Solving with ST - Practical & Matter-Of-Fact

”Let ́s do it the right way”


Practical & Matter-Of-Facts:

Sarah Person

Problem Solving Strengths of Practical & Matter-Of-Facts

  • Get to the point
    Explain what the purpose of the conversation is. Do not waste time on chitchat. Be concise and avoid vague statements.
  • Be factual
    Be accurate with facts and present them in a structured way. Start at the beginning and proceed step by step. Be prepared to go into details especially concerning “when, how and why.”
  • Be concrete
    Talk about the tangible, realistic and practical aspects. Use examples. Avoid talking too much about “the big picture” and how things relate on a higher level unless the ST requests this. Focus on the here and now.
  • Include experience
    Recognise the need for knowing the tried and tested ways – what works. Ask about past experience in similar situations.
  • Refer to logic
    Focus on logic and analysis. Pros and cons. Remember that efficiency and logical and coherent arguments are important.
  • Focus on tasks
    Talk about specific tasks and problem solving. Be matter-of-fact. Remember to distinguish between personal and impersonal matters.
  • Be direct
    Be objective and direct in your communication. Avoid ambiguity and do not soften your message. Tell it like it is. Ask specific questions.
  • Acknowledge accomplishments
    Be concrete and give examples of good results. Do not use truisms as praise.
  • Motivating words for ST
    Examine, apply, simplify, specify.

Help Practical & Matter-Of-Facts Problem Solve to:

  • The overall perspective
    Step back and consider the purpose of the task in a large perspective. Hold back on the details. Are we trying to solve the right problem? Consider the impact of the solution in the long run – especially concerning the people involved.
  • Think outside the box
    Brainstorm options. Try new approaches. Look for other possible solutions beyond the already proven ones. Practise solving problems with imprecise instructions and try out tasks where you do not have experience to draw on.
  • Focus on people
    Consider the human aspects, the values, and how the solution will be perceived by the people affected – now and in the long run. Cooperate with others to get their perspective on people’s needs.
  • Put things into context
    Consider the context and what consequences a solution will have in other areas and for other people. Is the solution still appropriate? Is the solution valuable in other contexts?
  • Adapt
    Where appropriate, adapt the solution to people’s needs and the large context – even if it is not ”the right solution” in your opinion.

Problem Solving with SF - Sympathetic & Friendly

“Let’s cooperate”


Sympathetic & Friendlys:

Beth Person
Bob Person
Catherine Person
Elise Person
Sandra Person

Problem Solving Strengths of Sympathetic & Friendlys

  • Show a personal interest
    Start by asking how the SF is doing. Remember that a good atmosphere and trust between you is essential. Be friendly.
  • Know your facts
    Get the facts right and present them in a structured way. Start at the beginning and proceed step by step. Be prepared to go into details especially when it concerns people and their relationships.
  • Be concrete
    Talk about the tangible, realistic and practical aspects. Use examples. Avoid talking too much about “the big picture” and how things relate on a higher level unless the SF requests this. Focus on the here and now.
  • Focus on human aspects
    Involve values, concern for others and personal views as important data. Focus on how to meet practical needs of people in their everyday lives.
  • Include experience
    Accommodate the need for knowing the tried and tested ways – what works. Ask about past experience in similar situations.
  • Make conversation
    Avoid talking too much without the SF being involved. Show interest and sympathy. Ask specific questions. Be open to hearing personal reactions. Focus on building the relationship.
  • Be positive
    Keep criticism at a minimum. Tone down your language. Be people centred. Remember that caring for others is important for the SF.
  • Give sincere compliments
    Acknowledge results, but also remember to praise personal involvement, cooperation and contributions during the process.
  • Motivating words for SF
    Share, cooperate, help, describe.

Help Sympathetic & Friendlys Problem Solve to:

  • The overall perspective
    Step back and consider the purpose of the task in a large perspective. Hold back on the details. Are we trying to solve the right problem? Consider the impact of the solution in the long run – especially concerning regulations, resources, economic impact etc.
  • Think outside the box
    Brainstorm options. Try new approaches. Look for other possible solutions beyond the already proven ones. Practise solving problems with imprecise instructions and try out tasks with no experience to draw on or where you are not able to work with others.
  • Put things in context
    Consider the large context and what consequences a solution will have in other areas – both negative and positive. Is the solution logically defensible? Can the solution prove valuable in other contexts?
  • Objective analysis
    Make an objective and logical analysis of the problem. Remember to include the unpleasant facts. Keep a cool head. Put emotional information and people’s needs aside for a moment.
  • Adapt
    Where appropriate, adapt the solution to what is logical and valuable in the long run – even if it seems unkind or you think it will take too long before the solution produces results.

Problem Solving with NF - Enthusiastic & Insightful

“Let’s do it in a different way”


Enthusiastic & Insightfuls:

Angela Person
Robert Person

Problem Solving Strengths of Enthusiastic & Insightfuls

  • Show a personal interest
    Start by asking how the NF is doing. Remember that harmony, a positive attitude and an authentic relationship between you is essential.
  • Present the vision
    Explain how the NF fits with the vision in a meaningful way. Remember to focus on why what you are talking about is important for human growth and development. Talk about the “higher purpose”. Present options.
  • Present the big picture
    Talk about concepts and themes and clarify correlations and context. Be associative, not sequential. Avoid too many details unless the NF requests this.
  • Focus on the long-term perspective
    Be future-oriented. Talk about new solutions and opportunities for development of human potential – especially in the long run.
  • Be open
    Acknowledge initiatives concerning new and different ways of doing things. Do not turn down ideas too fast. Challenge the imagination. Ask open-ended questions.
  • Make conversation
    Avoid talking too much without the NF being involved. Dialogue is the most important tool for the NF. Show interest and empathy. Tone down your language.
  • Incorporate values
    Consider values and needs of people as important data. Allow and invite personal views and idealistic thoughts.
  • Give sincere compliments
    Appreciate the ideas and unique role of the NF, and remember to praise contributions to the process and personality not just accomplishments.
  • Motivating words for NF
    Create, discover, reform, imagine.

Help Enthusiastic & Insightfuls Problem Solve to:

  • Be realistic
    Examine the mundane factors which may be necessary to bring a solution to life, including economic and structural limitations. Be careful not to overlook important details or facts.
  • Use experience
    Do not reinvent the wheel every time. Establish if there is experience to draw on. Keep what works well – do not change for the sake of change.
  • Focus
    Hold back generating possibilities until you have collected more facts about the task at hand. Include short-term perspectives and what logically makes sense to launch right now. Be careful not to make decisions based solely on personal values and ideals
  • Objective analysis
    Make an objective and logical analysis of the task. Remember to include the unpleasant facts. Keep a cool head. Put aside your ideals and concerns for people’s needs for a moment.
  • Adapt
    Where appropriate, adapt the solution to what is logical and valuable right now – even if it seems unkind or too short-sighted and unambitious to you.

Problem Solving with NT - Logical & Ingenious

”Let’s change the system”


Logical & Ingeniouss:

Problem Solving Strengths of Logical & Ingeniouss

  • Present the vision
    Start by telling about the vision and what the NT’s intellectual contribution to advance the vision is or could be. Present options.
  • Focus on competence
    Establish credibility quickly. Be convincing. Recognise theoretical knowledge and competence. Remember that focus on problem solving is important.
  • Describe the big picture
    Talk about concepts and themes and clarify correlations and context. Avoid too many details unless the NT requests this.
  • Focus on the long-term perspective
    Be future-oriented. Talk about the opportunities for strategic progress and improvement of the current structures – especially in the long run.
  • Be open
    Acknowledge proposals about new and different ways of doing things. Try not to reject ideas too fast. Give autonomy. Ask open-ended questions.
  • Debate ideas and analyses
    Present exciting challenges to conquer. View questions and critique as a contribution to a better analysis and a better strategy. Be prepared to argue. The NT appreciates a good debate.
  • Be direct
    Be objective, systematic, logical, analytical and straightforward in your communication. Do not soften your message. Tell it like it is.
  • Acknowledge ideas and accomplishments
    Appreciate the NT’s ability to think outside the box and challenge the existing notions. Acknowledge results and “intellectual mastery”.
  • Motivating words for NT
    Develop, critisise, theorise, conceptualise.

Help Logical & Ingeniouss Problem Solve to:

  • Be realistic
    Examine the mundane factors which may be necessary to bring a solution to life, including human relations. Be careful not to overlook important details or facts. Match ambitions with what is possible in terms of time and resources.
  • Use experience
    Do not reinvent the wheel every time. Establish if there is experience to draw on. Initiate only necessary changes – do not change for the sake of change. Be careful not to overthink or complicate things unnecessarily. Accept that also routine tasks need to be done.
  • Focus
    Hold back generating possibilities until you have collected more facts about the task at hand. Do not ignore specific conditions and data which may argue for solutions that generate results in the short run.
  • People focus
    Involve the human aspects, the values, and how people will perceive the solution. Remember to show consideration for people in the process. A bad process can lead to a bad result – even though it may be a ”correct” result. Cooperate.
  • Adapt
    Where appropriate, adapt the solution to meet human needs and desires in the short term – even if the solution is not as visionary and ambitious as you would wish for.
Team Problem Solving Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation

Team Visual Type and Go-To Behaviors 011

This is a visual model of Carl Jung’s Psychological Types showing that each person uses all eight behaviors.

This section shows the visual type of the team, effectively the 8 cognitive functions as a ratio for the team. This view is heavily influenced by the dominant and secondary functions from each person and assumes that later functions will come up less frequently in a group setting.
Your browser does not support HTML Canvas 5.
Team Visual Type and Go-To Behaviors Authors
Original work by: Sterling Bates Gene Bellotti © Step Research Corporation

Team Leadership Strengths & Weaknesses 012

Shows a list of Strengths and Weaknesses for this team.

This section leverages the 50+ leadership strengths as defined by the Center for Creative Leadership to highlight which strengths are likely to be demonstrated well by the team and which are likely to be shown either infrequently or poorly. The framing around Strengths and Weaknesses is meant to mirror the traditional corporate business SWOT analysis thinking (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) and complete the Team Engagement Styles section.

Strengths

Establish Plans
Preparing Written Communication
Structure and Policies
Planning and Setting Priorities
Manage Implementation of Projects

Leadership Behavior Categories

Leadership Behavior Category Detail

Administrative Behaviors

Using processes to analyze, prioritize, and document plans.

Administrative Behavior Strengths
Score:
Develop Systems and Processes
43
Establish Plans
95
Manage Implementation of Projects
67
Structure and Policies
95
Work Efficiency
64

Communication Behaviors

Knowing when to share or extravert information and being very intentional by thinking through or introverting about what is said as a manager and leader.

Communication Behavior Strengths
Score:
Confronting Effectively
50
Delivering Presentations
36
Fostering Open Communication
57
Informing Appropriately
5
Listening to Others
56
Preparing Written Communication
95
Speaking Effectively
41

Executive Behaviors

Demonstrating control, structure, direction and order while coaching others and actively managing change issues.

Executive Behavior Strengths
Score:
Championing Change
64
Coaching and Developing Others
30
Delegating Effectively
9
Exhibiting Courage
36
Fostering Teamwork
50
Influencing Others
32
Managing Through Systems
43
Motivating Others
57
Planning and Setting Priorities
73
Providing Direction
9

Interpersonal Behaviors

Showing interest in others and seeking to promote their well being, demonstrating compassion and sensitivity to others.

Interpersonal Behavior Strengths
Score:
Approachability
50
Building Relationships
50
Demonstrating Compassion
50
Displaying Organizational Savvy
64
Exhibiting Good Humor
32
Exhibiting Patience
64
Leveraging Networks
36
Managing Boss Relationships
9
Managing Disagreements
9
Valuing Diversity
57

Motivation Behaviors

Demonstrating an interest in others, providing support and challenge, and showing an openness to future possibilities.

Motivation Behavior Strengths
Score:
Action Oriented
36
Demonstrating Commitments for Developing Others
57
Drive for Results
9
Learning Oriented
32
Perserverance
5
Show Work Commitments
9

Organizational Strategy Behaviors

Demonstrating attention to tactical and visionary activities, some evidence of linking systems and market forces.

Organizational Strategy Behavior Strengths
Score:
Commit to Quality
5
Focus on Customer Needs
57
Innovation Management
11
Manage Profitability
42
Promote Corporate Citizenship
50
Recognize Global Implications
64

Self-Management Behaviors

Knowing oneself and exhibiting efforts to learn and grow

Self-Management Behavior Strengths
Score:
Composure
9
Demonstrating Adaptability
64
Acting with Integrity (not scoreable)
Score: **
Developing oneself (not scoreable)
Score: **
Intellectual Horsepower (not scoreable)
Score: **

Thinking Skills Behaviors

Reasonable and rational behavior is highly prized in organizational life. We often get clarity in our assumptions and premises and analyze our choices accordingly.

Thinking Skills Behavior Strengths
Score:
Critically Analyzing Business Issues
9
Dealing with Ambiguity
32
Demonstrating Sound Judgement
41
Innovating
64
Thinking Strategically
48

All Leadership Competencies

Team Leadership Strengths & Weaknesses Authors
Original work by: Sterling Bates © Step Research Corporation

Group Energy Preferences 013

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

Energy Extraversion/Introversion Group Preferences

25% 75%
Extraversion

Energised by the outer world
Talk, think, talk
Action
Breadth

  • Angela Person
  • Bob Person
Introversion

Energised by the inner world
Think, talk, think
Reflection
Depth

  • Beth Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Robert Person
  • Sandra Person
  • Sarah Person


Team Meetings with Extraversion

People in this group with Extraversion:
Angela Person Bob Person

  • Energised by the outer world
  • Talk, think, talk
  • Action
  • Breadth

How to spot Extraversion

  • Talk a lot – and often loud and fast. Respond quickly.
  • Process out loud so others tend to know what they are thinking. Develop ideas through discussion.
  • Interrupt when you are speaking – seem eager or impatient.
  • Discuss a variety of subjects at the same time and move quickly from one topic to the next.
  • Pay attention to the external world – get distracted easily.
  • Use body language, gesticulate and share their energy outwardly.
  • Take initiative in making contact with other people – use eye contact, small talk, often start a conversation.
  • Push to get started right away – action oriented. Do not need much reflection time. “Shoot from the hip”.
  • Contribute enthusiastically when working in groups. Want to learn new tasks by talking and doing.
  • Have a broad social network and a variety of interests.
  • Do not seem to mind interruptions when working.
  • Prefer spoken communication rather than written communication when they are free to choose.

Ask those with Extraversion to:

  • Restrain your talkativeness format_quote Control your urge to process out loud. Share only what is needed. Do not repeat something that has already been said. format_quote
  • Do not interrupt format_quote Be vigilant about not being so eager to speak that you are willing to plow into what someone else is saying. Do not start speaking even if others hesitate in the middle of a sentence. They are probably focused on finding the most accurate way to express their thoughts. format_quote
  • Involve the quiet format_quote Involve the participants who do not readily contribute with their thoughts. Ask if they have something they want to add. Respect their right to “pass” if they are not ready. Consider scheduling a one-on-one later to get their input. format_quote
  • Slow down format_quote Use pauses when you speak. Pauses will give others the opportunity to comment. They may not like to interrupt and compete for “airtime”. format_quote
  • Be patient with reaction time format_quote Do not expect an immediate response from everyone when you introduce a new idea. Give them time to process the idea and if possible plan a follow-up meeting where the idea can be discussed again. format_quote
  • Give time for reflection format_quote When you introduce new ideas or tasks at the meeting, show consideration for the need for time to reflect before those who prefer I can commit themselves to particular tasks they would like to work on. format_quote
  • Give space after the meeting format_quote Respect the need of those who prefer I for time alone after a meeting to reflect and recharge. Meetings often drain their energy. format_quote


Team Meetings with Introversion

People in this group with Introversion:
Beth Person Catherine Person Elise Person Robert Person Sandra Person Sarah Person

  • Energised by the inner world
  • Think, talk, think
  • Reflection
  • Depth

How to spot Introversion

  • Listen more than they talk – and often speak calmly. Talk more in one-on-one situations.
  • Process internally – when talking, they most often only convey the essence/conclusion of their chain of thought.
  • Pause in the conversation – and shut down if you interrupt them. May seem withholding.
  • Talk in-depth about one subject before moving to the next.
  • Sustain concentration and focus for long, and they may seem like they are in their own world.
  • Calm body language – seem reserved.
  • Limit social interaction with other people to what is “necessary”.
  • Seem cautious and hesitant – they need time to reflect before acting.
  • Enjoy working alone and like quiet surroundings. Want to learn new tasks by reading and reflecting.
  • Have few but close relationships and explore interests in-depth.
  • Seem to be disturbed by interruptions when working
  • Prefer written communication rather than spoken communication when they are free to choose.

Ask those with Introversion to:

  • Prepare format_quote Ask for an agenda and the meeting material before the meeting so that you can prepare how you will contribute to the conversation. format_quote
  • Talk more format_quote Speak up. Share your point of view. Do not wait too long. Interrupt when it is necessary, even if it feels uncomfortable. Show your enthusiasm – do not keep it to yourself. format_quote
  • Resist pressure format_quote Be patient if others try to finish your sentences or insist that you say something. Point out that you need a moment to think. format_quote
  • Be patient with thinking out loud format_quote Do not assume that those who talk a lot during meetings are not interested in your input. They are probably working through an idea by talking about it, or they expect you to contribute when you have something to say. format_quote
  • Use your body language format_quote Maintain eye contact with the person speaking, and show with your body language that you are interested in what he or she is saying. Nod, smile, lean forward. format_quote
  • Engage format_quote Accept that sometimes the best way to understand a new situation is to engage in it and learn from the experience. format_quote
  • Accept the need for a meeting format_quote Remember that people who prefer E are energised by social interaction, and that they think best when talking or sharing with other people. They may also want to meet face to face to ensure that everyone is on the same side. Accept it, even if you do not yourself consider it necessary to meet. format_quote
Group Energy Preferences Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation

Group Information Preferences 014

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

Information Sensing/Intuition Group Preferences

50% 50%
Sensing

Here and now
Details
Realistic
The five senses

  • Bob Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Sarah Person
Intuition

Future
The big picture
Visionary
The sixth sense

  • Angela Person
  • Beth Person
  • Robert Person
  • Sandra Person


Team Meetings with Sensing

People in this group with Sensing:
Bob Person Catherine Person Elise Person Sarah Person

  • Here and now
  • Details
  • Realistic
  • The five senses

How to spot Sensing

  • Talk about real life, people they know, things that have happened or will happen, the here and now – ”what is”.
  • Present the facts first. Talk in precise terms, use detailed descriptions, similes. Have a straightforward speech pattern. Speak literally.
  • Refer to common sense and experience and what is feasible.
  • Ask about the facts and details of a case/situation.
  • Appear to lose interest if it gets too hypothetical and airy fairy.
  • Down-to-earth. Point out if something is unpractical or unrealistic.
  • Start their story at the beginning and build it in a linear fashion, step by step. Explain in detail.
  • Seek practical and efficient solutions. Talk about improving things – not changing them.
  • Unlikely to embrace new ideas unless they are grounded in reality – they will ask questions about ”how”. Trust tangible data and facts.
  • Seem reluctant to change the tried and tested unless it is necessary – refer to what works.
  • Seem more engaged when a task requires skills already learned.
  • Ask about “what” and “how” when assigned a new task – would like to know the established way before deciding how to tackle it.

Ask those with Sensing to:

  • Make room for brainstorming format_quote Tolerate the need of others to brainstorm even if you yourself cannot see the point. Wait before you shut down initial ideas with practical concerns. The wild ideas can pave the way for an ambitious yet realistic solution. format_quote
  • Be open to change format_quote Remember that when others suggest changes, they are not trying to turn your world upside-down. Those who prefer N think about possibilities and new ideas. Make space for them. format_quote
  • Be open to new methods format_quote When something needs to be changed, be open to discussions about replacing existing methods rather than simply improving status quo. format_quote
  • Do not overwhelm others with details format_quote Remember to talk about the big picture as well. format_quote
  • Voice your concerns format_quote If you believe that a proposed change is not feasible, draw attention to your concerns. Those who prefer N may not have your eye for facts and practicalities. format_quote
  • Seek out further details yourself format_quote When the rest of the participants in a discussion are ready to proceed but you need more details, plan a follow-up conversation with the parties involved in order to get the information you need. Be careful not to derail the discussions from their overall goal by getting caught up in minutiae. format_quote
  • Ask about the relevance format_quote If a discussion becomes too abstract, ask the others to relate the discussion to the concrete practical reality. If the discussion goes too much off topic, gently bring it back to the task at hand. format_quote


Team Meetings with Intuition

People in this group with Intuition:
Angela Person Beth Person Robert Person Sandra Person

  • Future
  • The big picture
  • Visionary
  • The sixth sense

How to spot Intuition

  • Talk about opportunities, new ideas, concepts, patterns, visions and coherences – “what could be”.
  • Present the big picture first. Talk in general and abstract terms – use metaphors and speak figuratively.
  • Refer to things as being “intuitively correct” or that something “could theoretically work”.
  • Ask for the underlying ”meaning” and the context of an issue. The overall purpose.
  • Appear to lose interest if too many details are presented in a story.
  • Often say “Imagine that…”. Point out if something is unambitious and want to think big.
  • Begin their story at the end and articulate the totality, skip around easily in the story and may miss some parts. Intuitive hunches.
  • Interested in new ideas and new solutions – because they are new. Talk about changing things – not just improving them.
  • Quickly become enthusiastic about a new idea. Trust their intuition and theories.
  • Seem reluctant to do the same thing twice and follow a routine unless they have to – prefer to do it in a new way.
  • Seem more engaged when a task requires a new and creative approach.
  • Do not ask for instructions when assigned a new task – want to solve it in their own way

Ask those with Intuition to:

  • Stick to the point format_quote Restrain your urge to look for associations, related topics and “what-if”s during discussions. Stay focused on the specific issue under consideration. format_quote
  • Stay attentive format_quote Focus on the discussion and the meeting also while discussing specific, concrete issues and facts. Do not let your thoughts wander off. format_quote
  • Be realistic format_quote Even though you believe that something is not working as well as it could, be open to a discussion of whether the benefits of the change outweigh the costs. Remember also that small changes are easier to implement than big ones. format_quote
  • Draw on experience format_quote Include past experience and expertise in discussions when something needs to be changed. Ask about others’ experience. format_quote
  • Listen to objections format_quote If others are hesitant about changes, assume that they have a good reason, and encourage them to express their concerns. Take objections about feasibility seriously. format_quote
  • Explain more format_quote Put more words on your insights than you find necessary. People who prefer S tend to think that the contributions of those who prefer N are too jumpy and incoherent. Help them understand how your ideas will work in practice. format_quote
  • Leave time for concrete information format_quote Be sure to provide enough details to the people who prefer S at the meeting to ensure they have an adequate basis for discussion. Be patient with their need to talk about the details, and then gently bring the discussion back to the task at hand. format_quote
Group Information Preferences Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation

Group Decision Preferences 015

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

Decisions Thinking/Feeling Group Preferences

38% 63%
Thinking

Logic
Task centred
Competence
Fairness

  • Beth Person
  • Sandra Person
  • Sarah Person
Feeling

Values
People centred
Harmony
Compassion

  • Angela Person
  • Bob Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Robert Person


Team Meetings with Thinking

People in this group with Thinking:
Beth Person Sandra Person Sarah Person

  • Logic
  • Task centred
  • Competence
  • Fairness

How to spot Thinking

  • Tend to first notice and deal with points of disagreement. Go “head on”. Focus on efficiency.
  • Comfortable with arguing and have no hard feelings afterwards.
  • Generally quick to tell others where they need to improve. Are “totally truthful” and may forget the diplomat.
  • Direct when communicating and may seem tough-minded and critical.
  • Assess others’ competence by asking challenging questions. Seem to like competition.
  • Ask ”why” and search for logical coherence. May unwittingly hurt the feelings of others.
  • Focus on problem solving. Offer objective advice to help. ”Mr. Fix-it.”
  • Argue for what they believe is logical – and often present a lot of arguments.
  • Talk about the objectively speaking ”right solution” and refer to analyses, the pros and cons, fairness and consistency.
  • Ungenerous with their compliments. Recognise results but rarely praise effort.
  • Use objective principles and a logic-centred approach as a foundation for their opinions. Distrust decisions based solely on “illogical feelings”.
  • Seem task centred and business-like (and may sometimes seem cold and impersonal).

Ask those with Thinking to:

  • Create a good setting format_quote Start the meeting by making an effort to create the right atmosphere. Do not jump right in. Allow the participants to find their legs. format_quote
  • Soften your language format_quote Avoid blunt communication unless the situation requires it. Tone down your language so that others do not switch off because you said it “that way”. Be friendly. format_quote
  • Establish ”common ground” format_quote In a discussion firstly talk about areas of agreement that way establishing ”common ground” maintaining a good atmosphere. Focus on expressing the positives before the negatives – otherwise people who prefer F may believe you are opposed to an idea, which can demotivate them. format_quote
  • Allow room for values and subjective data format_quote Remember that those who prefer F tend to make better decisions when they include personal values. Accommodate this at the meeting. format_quote
  • Pay attention to feelings format_quote Focus on others’ feelings and needs, both at the meeting and in regard to the decisions being made. Make an effort to understand and incorporate others’ points of view when making a decision, even if you disagree with what they have said. format_quote
  • Combine logic with values format_quote Use your own personal values to complement your logical arguments and analyses, especially when discussing decisions that affect people. People who prefer F are more likely to be persuaded by arguments which incorporate values and not just pure logic. format_quote


Team Meetings with Feeling

People in this group with Feeling:
Angela Person Bob Person Catherine Person Elise Person Robert Person

  • Values
  • People centred
  • Harmony
  • Compassion

How to spot Feeling

  • Highlight areas of agreement. Try to establish harmony and concensus.
  • Often avoid conflicts, withdraw from discussions or try to “smooth things out”. May become uncharacteristically direct if values are violated.
  • Seem uncomfortable pointing out errors and receiving critical feedback. May seem touchy and take things personally.
  • Naturally tuned in to people’s feelings and soften their language.
  • Want to know and understand personal standpoints. Cooperate rather than compete.
  • Accept decisions based on values and personal motivations.
  • Focus on people. Help people by showing concern for their needs.
  • Argue for what they believe is ”right or wrong” and what is ”good or bad”.
  • Talk about the “best solution” for the people involved and refer to core values.
  • Give compliments and express their appreciation to others easily. Often give praise – both for results and effort.
  • Use values and the needs of other people as a foundation for their opinions. Distrust decisions based solely on “cold insensitive logic”.
  • Seem accommodating and empathic (and may sometimes seem evasive and soft).

Ask those with Feeling to:

  • Speak up if you disagree format_quote Be aware not to keep silent just because you find it uncomfortable to express dissent. It will impede discussion and thus a better outcome. format_quote
  • Communicate more directly format_quote Watch your tendency to communicate indirectly for example by saying ”Don’t you think?” when you really mean ”I think”. When asked like that, people who prefer T will give you an answer based on their logical conclusions. It may feel as if they rejected your opinion but technically you have not expressed your opinion – you asked for theirs. format_quote
  • Be firm format_quote If someone challenges your ideas, do not automatically interpret this as disagreement. It is part of the decision making process to argue and ask critical questions in order to check for consistency. Do not give in too quickly. format_quote
  • Objective data before subjective format_quote Present objective data before subjective data when making an argument. If you start with subjective data, those who prefer T may lose interest. format_quote
  • Commit format_quote Sometimes it is necessary to make tough decisions that affect others negatively. If the effect on people has been discussed seriously at the meeting, do not fail to commit simply because you feel uncomfortable about the decision. format_quote
  • Combine values with logic format_quote Remember that people with a preference for T distrust decisions based on sentiment, feelings or personal attachments. They are more likely to be persuaded by arguments which also include logic, analysis and/or principles and not just the “people factor”. format_quote
Group Decision Preferences Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation

Group Lifestyle Preferences 016

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

This shows a groups balance of preferences and how each preference can be more effective in meetings.

Lifestyle Judging/Perceiving Group Preferences

50% 50%
Judging

Control
Closure
Plans
In good time

  • Bob Person
  • Catherine Person
  • Elise Person
  • Sarah Person
Perceiving

Freedom
Process
Flexibility
Just in time

  • Angela Person
  • Beth Person
  • Robert Person
  • Sandra Person


Team Meetings with Judging

People in this group with Judging:
Bob Person Catherine Person Elise Person Sarah Person

  • Control
  • Closure
  • Plans
  • In good time

How to spot Judging

  • Have a clear distinction between work and play – seem serious and decisive.
  • Organised. Use lists, a calendar and systems to keep track of time, meetings, tasks and appointments (and take pleasure in using them).
  • Set goals, make plans and follow them. Express resentment about changing a plan or a decision.
  • Articulate frustration when experiencing too many ”loose ends”. Want predictability and matters settled.
  • Prefer to make decisions quickly – and want others to do the same. ”We might as well make a decision now.”
  • Most enthusiastic in the completion phase of a project.
  • When asked for their opinion, they will typically answer quickly – often without asking clarifying questions.
  • Tend to make statements that end with an exclamation mark! Do not easily change their mind.
  • Have visibly organised work and living spaces. Put things away so they can easily find them.
  • Seem in a hurry – walk fast and focus on being effective.
  • Work at a steady pace until the submission of assignments.
  • Arrive on time and deliver on time – or sooner – and expect that others do the same.

Ask those with Judging to:

  • There are many good approaches format_quote Remember that your way is not the only good way, and that those who prefer P do not only like options and choices – they need them. format_quote
  • Be patient format_quote Do not let your desire to move forward in the meeting lead you to insist on a decision before you have gathered sufficient information. format_quote
  • Be open format_quote Tolerate the need of those who prefer P to talk about, analyse and then try out several different options. They do not mind making mistakes as long as they learn something in the process. format_quote
  • Put off sharing your opinion format_quote Be careful not to take a stand too quickly. It can cause a deadlock. When you are tempted to seek closure, ask more questions to obtain additional pertinent information. format_quote
  • Volunteer to finish up format_quote Offer to take on tasks in the completion phase of a project to tie up loose ends. Those who prefer P may have run out of energy. format_quote
  • Be open to adapting plans format_quote Be careful not to become so attached to your plans that you miss new information or opportunities. Be open to proposals about adjustments and revisions. format_quote
  • Embrace spontaneity format_quote Try not to be so rigid with the agenda that there is no room for spontaneous ideas and having fun. format_quote
  • Summarise format_quote Finish the meeting with an overview of the agreements made and who does what and when. People who prefer P tend to forget to write these things down. Make it clear when a deadline is important and why, as well as when input is expected to be delivered. format_quote


Team Meetings with Perceiving

People in this group with Perceiving:
Angela Person Beth Person Robert Person Sandra Person

  • Freedom
  • Process
  • Flexibility
  • Just in time

How to spot Perceiving

  • Combine work and play – seem open and informal.
  • Flexible and sometimes inattentive when it comes to time, meetings and tasks. Usually see organising as unnecessary and limiting.
  • Do not make many plans and deviate from the ones they do make – reopen agreements and decisions. Are good at adapting.
  • Articulate frustration about rigid structures and too many rules and regulations. Seek freedom and flexibility in order to be able to take advantage of unexpected opportunities.
  • Postpone decisions for as long as possible. “It’s ages from now.”
  • Are most enthusiastic at the beginning of a project and want to try out several different approaches.
  • When asked for their opinion, they will typically delay offering an opinion and will ask questions to get more information.
  • Tend to make statements that end with a question mark – indicating their open-ended approach to life? Easily change their mind.
  • Do not ”organise” work and living spaces. Leave things in the open so they can easily find them.
  • Appear as if they have lots of time, go with the flow, relaxed.
  • Often wait until the deadline gets closer to work on a task. Often say they work more efficiently under time pressure.
  • Time optimists – do not always arrive on time and deliver just in time.

Ask those with Perceiving to:

  • Be on time or before format_quote Have a list of small tasks on you mobile you can work on to avoid the feeling of ”wasting your time” before the meeting starts. format_quote
  • Decide format_quote Do not let your desire to gather more information and keep your options open keep you from making a timely decision. format_quote
  • Leave time to organise format_quote Understand that your need to try several different approaches can overwhelm people who prefer J. Allow time for a discussion on how to organise, so they do not switch off. format_quote
  • Control the improviser format_quote Try not to rely so much on your ability to improvise that you reach the point where you avoid planning. Remember that people who prefer J take plans seriously. format_quote
  • Volunteer to initiate the process format_quote Offer to take on tasks in the initial phase of a project when your energy level and your enthusiasm are at their peak. format_quote
  • Control your inner time optimist format_quote Be realistic about the time it will take for you to complete a task, so you can keep your promises. format_quote
  • Keep an eye on the agenda and the time format_quote Be careful not to stray too much from the agenda, and do not reopen decisions unless it is crucial. Be realistic about what you can achieve at the meeting. Sometimes there is no time to consider a subject from all angles. format_quote
  • Be aware of deadlines format_quote Listen for agreements on deadlines at the meeting and write them down. Ask when others expect your input. format_quote
Group Lifestyle Preferences Authors
Original work by: Mette Babitzkow Boje Tina Brøndum Kristjánsson © Step Research Corporation